Section 75 Agreement Social Care

An example of efficiency improvements generated by common structures can be found in the City of Liverpool, where a single commissioning unit has been established with a Section 75 partnership contract. Back-office savings are estimated at around €1.5 million per year. These savings are the result of shared systems and overhead costs used by the integrated unit team. The team`s location in common premises, a single health informatics system, a single performance management system and coordinated indicators and common results objectives contribute to a more efficient and targeted working practice. The Examination Board (2009: 19) notes that the lack of formal joint financing agreements can be explained by the need for the provision of social services. Charging is the most common for services of the elderly. While there are no legal barriers to the integration of services with respect to reasonable charges for the Commission element, partners should be aware of the mechanisms of these agreements. This complication therefore constitutes a dissuasive incentive for pooled financing opportunities. The partnership agreements referred to in Section 75, provided for in the NHS Act 2006, allow budgets to be pooled between healthcare planners/providers and social service providers, resources and management structures can be integrated. Most NHS trusts, care trusts and boards have some form of pooled funding agreements, with pooled funds accounting for around 3.4% of the total health and social services budget. Legislation was developed at the national level and followed the previous Health Act (1999). Joint work and the use of legal flexibilities, such as the Section 75 Partnership Agreement, has been encouraged by national policy agendas such as the World-Class Commission, „Strong and Prosperous Communities“ (2006), „Our Health, Our Care, Our Say“ (2006), „Putting People First“ (2007) and „Transforming Community Services“ (2009). Integrated care structures have performed well in world-class assessments (working in partnership is a key competence) and provide greater incentives for local authorities to develop common structures in the area of health and social systems.

Within LTC, it is more community services than hospital care facilities that have the greatest potential to be developed through pooled budgets and joint action plans. Joint structures, with pooled funding, have set up multidisciplinary teams, led by nurses, to help the elderly in the community. . . .